I think, therefore I am. I am, therefore I sail

Tag: zzZippety Doo Dah Page 2 of 4

Moving the boat to Seattle

Today was the day! After waiting many months zzZippety Doo Dah has finally moved to Seattle’s Elliot Bay Marina :).

Zippey has been moored in Bremerton, WA since I purchased the boat in Everett, WA and sailed her down. Zippey is not only my first boat, I also learned to sail on her. The Sinclair Inlet area around Bremerton has been a great place to learn to sail. Winds are moderate and waves small to non-existant. The marina in Bremerton is also great. I have been very happy there, but alas, now that I live in Seattle it has been a pain to schedule sailing trips around a one hour ferry trip.

Since it has taken me so long to do a full write up I am just going to post some pics, and maybe come back to this later as it is a historic occasion 🙂

 

 

First outing of the year – Testing the new Yamaha 8hp outboard

The last log entry noted that I had purchased a new motor for Zippey. I am happy to say that one week later I had a chance to clean up the boat, mount the motor, and take Zippey out for her first sail of the year.

Interesting note: Upon arrival at the marina I noticed a rather large and expensive powerboat floating freely in the guest dock area. The dock lines were hanging in the water so she must have come loose in the heavy winds the previous day. I was just barely able to get my boat hook around one of the deck stanchions and pull her back into the dock. Tied her down nice and good and reported the incident to the marina office. I got a call from them about an hour later. Turns out that after looking the boat up with the Coast Guard it was found to have been stolen three days prior from Lake Union. Apparently the thieves took a joy ride to the Bremerton Marina where they ditched the boat.

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Back to Zippey. Due to economic and life circumstances it has been just slightly over one year since Zippey has been out of the marina. In that time ( not logged 🙁 ) Zippey has had her own adventures. She encountered storms that ripped away hatches and drenched the interior, and another storm that forced water up under the drop boards and inundated her with about 500 gallons of water, and again soaked the interior.  I had pulled most of the interior out for drying and mold prevention, and had started the installation of a new automatic bilge pump ( previously it was manual or nothing ), so the cabin was a pretty good wreck. After taking a couple hours to put everything back together my roommate Alcane helped me mount the 1994 Yamaha 2-stroke 8 hp motor to the transom. The fuel mixture was 50:1, which Alcane had found online, however the motor had a label on it of 100:1. The off mixture did not seem to cause any issues.

I love this motor! Fired on the first pull. That is fantastic! When in forward a cool jet comes out of the middle of the propeller and creates a neat looking streak behind the boat. Anyways, the motor worked great. The only issue I had with it is that it does not tilt up very far, so on a port tack the prop sits in the water and causes a small amount of drag.

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This was Alcane’s first sailing trip and I think he was a little confused as to what to be enjoying at first 😉

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When we initially cast off there had not been any wind, due to that I had not yet rigged the sails so we could get out on the water faster. I handed the till to Alcane and told him to have fun while I mounted the main into the boom track. By the time I had the main installed there was a whisper of wind, but enough to push the boat forward. I hoisted the main, turned off the motor and told Alcane to make the main look as much like a frito dip chip as he could and then went forward with the 130% genoa to hank onto the forestay. Alcane did a pretty good job. He has a technical mind so he caught on quickly. After hanking on the genoa I did not hoist it. Instead I went back to the cockpit and taught Alcane some sailing theory. A bit later when I hoisted the head sail I showed him how the sheets work and the general idea behind the two sails working together. Again he picked this up fairly quickly and soon we were making very good headway.

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Around 1430 Stephen Hollingsworth, and old work colleague, gave a call and we picked him up for a sail. Stephen is very excited about sailing and took over the tiller almost as soon as he came on-board. Stephen is a good pilot and communicated very well with Alcane on what we wanted the boat to do and how to accomplish it. I stood in the cabin entryway as Alcane handled the sheets. While Alcane usually did not have the genoa sheeted most optimally, for his first time out and not having a feel for sailing he did a dang good job. Stephen then taught him how to handle the sheets while both tacking and gybing.

We returned to the marina berth around 1700. It was a great day of sailing, winds were low and stable, perfect for a newbie, and the sky was clear and blue. I am very happy about the performance of the new motor, however the genoa is falling apart and will need to be replaced sometime this season before big holes are blown through it.

I am looking forward to another awesome year of sailing!

Finally! Time to sail again!

January 12ish of 2012 proved that not only is the old adage that women are bad luck on boats a real thing, boats are also highly jealous. “What the heck are you talking about Ben?” That was the last time I used my sailboat, not through my own desires. As you know I love sailing and I love my boat. It just so happens that on that fateful day I took a girl out for a romantic sail and lunch. Zippey did not like that too much. The motor wound up cutting out as we were coming back to dock and would not fire again. I barely got the girl on to shore in time for the ferry trip back to Seattle. Most of the rest of the year I was jobless and unable to get a new motor. Well no longer! Today I acquired a 1994 Yamaha 2-stroke 8 hp longshaft. It fires on the first pull and purrs like a kitten. Not only is this motor several decade newer, it is also a few dozen decibels quieter, which is always nice when there is no wind and you want to talk with passengers or crew.

I was unfortunately not able to get the boat out of the marina today, but it will be soon! The weather has been amazing lately and poor Zippey has been sitting tied up to her moorage for far to long. She wants out and she wants it now!

Bilge pump install part I

I received a text a couple weeks ago from a dear lady who lives on her beautiful sailboat in the marina my boat is moored in. She attached a pic asking if my bow seemed low. Indeed it did. As it turned out when I was there a few days prior I had moved some stuff around the cabin which shifted more weight to the bow. During a several day rainstorm this weight shift caused water to pool on my exterior companionway step. When the water reached the height of the slats closing the companion way it spilled inside and into the sink. Unfortunately the sink was clogged and after it filled the water spilled over into the interior. It soaked all my berths and carpet. My friend Mike, who lives on a beautiful 49 foot sailboat, was nice enough to take a look for me. There was 5 inches of water in the cabin! Keep in mind this is *past* the bilge, so in actuality there was more than a foot of water in my boat. Mike siphoned the water from the cabin and most of the bilge and stabilized the boat for me.

For some strange reason my boat did not come equipped with a bilge pump to take care of water build up. Today Mike guided me through what I needed to install the system. I was expecting it to take only a couple hours. HA! I started working on it at 11 am and stopped, unfinished, around 4 pm. After draining the bilge and trying it to the best of my ability I setup the bilge pump holder with epoxy and stuck it on the bottom of the bilge. Turns out that epoxy had sat too long and was bad. It did not hold. Next I tried some JB Weld. That sucked up some of the remaining moisture and did not harden. Both of these epoxies I let sit for about 45 minutes each. While they were attempting to harden I ran all the electrical and hoses.

I was unable to complete the install today. I left a heater blowing down into the bilge to dry the rest out. Hopefully next weekend it will be dry enough for the epoxy to set properly. I finally made it home around 5:30 pm, wet, cold, hungry, and smelling of stagnant bilge water ( I smelled like a sewer ). It was a very interesting day, groping around the innards of Zippey

ZDD: Bilge pump installation part I

I received a text a couple weeks ago from a dear lady who lives on her beautiful sailboat in the marina my boat is moored in. She attached a pic asking if my bow seemed low. Indeed it did. As it turned out when I was there a few days prior I had moved some stuff around the cabin which shifted more weight to the bow. During a several day rainstorm this weight shift caused water to pool on my exterior companionway step. When the water reached the height of the slats closing the companion way it spilled inside and into the sink. Unfortunately the sink was clogged and after it filled the water spilled over into the interior. It soaked all my berths and carpet. My friend Mike, who lives on a beautiful 49 foot sailboat, was nice enough to take a look for me. There was 5 inches of water in the cabin! Keep in mind this is *past* the bilge, so in actuality there was more than a foot of water in my boat. Mike siphoned the water from the cabin and most of the bilge and stabilized the boat for me.

For some strange reason my boat did not come equipped with a bilge pump to take care of water build up. Today Mike guided me through what I needed to install the system. I was expecting it to take only a couple hours. HA! I started working on it at 11 am and stopped, unfinished, around 4 pm. After draining the bilge and trying it to the best of my ability I setup the bilge pump holder with epoxy and stuck it on the bottom of the bilge. Turns out that epoxy had sat too long and was bad. It did not hold. Next I tried some JB Weld. That sucked up some of the remaining moisture and did not harden. Both of these epoxies I let sit for about 45 minutes each. While they were attempting to harden I ran all the electrical and hoses.

I was unable to complete the install today. I left a heater blowing down into the bilge to dry the rest out. Hopefully next weekend it will be dry enough for the epoxy to set properly. I finally made it home around 5:30 pm, wet, cold, hungry, and smelling of stagnant bilge water ( I smelled like a sewer ). It was a very interesting day, groping around the innards of Zippey

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