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Category: Aquarium Page 1 of 3

Nano Reef 13 gallon cleaned up

Nano Reef cleaned up!

The tank is doing great now! It has been several weeks without new issues cropping.

I did lose the Watchman Goby, everybody else is quite healthy though 🙂

The fish and invertebrates are still in the tank, just hiding in this photo.

Ecco Pro filtered tank

Eheim Ecco Pro Canister Filter Review

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With the upcoming build of my 90 gallon aquarium, I have been using my 30 gallon tank as a bit of a testbed for exploring different filtration methods. Thus far I have implemented an under gravel and a homemade sump.  Both have worked quite well. In this article, I will share the results of using the Eheim Ecco Pro canister filter. 

Ecco Pro

For three decades I have turned to under gravel filters as my filtration method of choice. Though incredibly simple, I will always contend that, when properly set up, the under gravel filter is a fantastic choice.

The sump was not your traditional sump, it was made from a 5 gallon bucket. I posted details on it in this article. It took some fiddling to get it, but in the end, it did the job it was supposed to do and kept the water a lot more clean than the under gravel filter. However, the wife was not a fan of the running water noise it produced, so back to the drawing board. 

While visiting my parents, I took a look at my father’s fish gear cabinet. There are things in there that have not been made in decades! It is a treasure trove, and in the corner of that pile, I spotted an Eheim Ecco Pro canister filter. I had found my next filter to test!

The hoses were missing and it was covered in thick, crusty, dust. My father did not know if it worked. I brought it home, disassembled it, and cleaned it up. When I first popped it open I was pleased to find it had three media compartments, which still contained Eheim’s glass beads. The Eheim Ecco Pro is a small canister, which gave me pause, 30 gallons is not a big tank, would this provide enough filtration?

Ecco Pro Media Baskets

The Ecco Pro is an outside-in filter, meaning that water comes into the canister around the outside of the media baskets. It is then sucked up from the bottom and through the middle of the media baskets. Water then gets pushed out the top via a return pump, and back into the tank. 

With filtration, there are three components that go into every system: mechanical, biological, and chemical. Unless you are an advanced fish keeper, they should also go in that order. When I looked at the order in the Ecco Pro baskets, I noticed the biological filtration was before the mechanical. Not only that, but Eheim’s own manual also shows it that way! For an otherwise great product, this misinformation disappointed me. Not to worry though, the baskets are highly configurable. I simply swapped in some of my own filter floss and moved the biological filtration later in the stack. 

Ecco Pro Sink Test

The Ecco Pro has been running on the 30 gallon for a couple months (as of the writing of this article). The numbers on my water test kit are consistently on target. The pump is nearly silent and there is no water flow noise, a big plus for my wife. I was able to use some common hose that I picked up at the local hardware store for cheap. 

Ecco Pro filtered tank

Would I use a canister filter on the 90 gallon tank? Yes, but not an Ecco Pro. 30 gallons is the max I would consider using it on. 

Do I recommend the Eheim Ecco Pro canister filter? Absolutely! It is a great unit, quiet and compact. The Eheim glass bio-media works well. Just make sure you put the mechanical filter in front of the biological or the biological media will gum up real fast and become ineffective. 

Link to manual

Check prices on amazon. 

Fifth week update on the nano reef tank cleanup

The tank is coming along quite well! The ecosystem seems to have stabilized. I believe that between restructuring the sump, the Aiptasia-X, and a mess of new snails, that the recovery is guaranteed.

With the last update, I mentioned the Aiptasia-X. There are 3 Peppermint Shrimp in the tank and they could not keep up with the rate of spread of the Aiptasia. I dosed the Aips two or three times while they were still populating like bunnies. Since then the numbers have not gone up. The Pepps are not doing an amazing job of eliminating them, but they are not spreading either. It has been a couple of weeks since the last dose. Used it again today and I am not seeing any more Aiptasia.

With the Aiptasia under control, I turned all my attention to the algae infestation. You saw two of the rocks were scrubbed clean last time. That was done outside the tank. Because I could not get the bubble tip anemone off the other rock, I have been scrubbing it in place. While hunting for a cheaper source for snails, I came across Reef Cleaners. At first, I was thrown off by their low prices, but they have tons of great reviews, so I ordered from them. John at Reef Cleaners is great! Top-notch customer service. He even followed through afterward to ask how everything was adjusting.

The new algae crew consists of 2 Turbo Snails, 5 Astrea, 3 Trochus, and 2 Blue Legged Hermit Crabs. Together, they have been able to stem the tide of algae in the tank. I also tried blacking out the tank last weekend, which seemed to help.

This wall had the worst of it!

Water changes are much better also! Before, the water I was pulling out was a dark muddy brown. The last change was nearly transparent.

The Bubble Tip Anemone now looks very healthy and happy. During the day it has been sticking out loud and proud. No more hiding inside the rock. It is good sized too, maybe five inches across.

Oscar, the Emerald Crab has been hamming it up on Instagram. 48 followers in just 13 days! https://www.instagram.com/crabnamedoscar/

All in all, the tank is coming along well!

 

 

How I made my first, CHEAP, aquarium sump

Sump filtration systems are popular amongst fish hobbyist, but in 33 years of fish keeping I have never had one on my tanks. My filter of choice is the good ‘ole under gravel. It can be a hotly debated method, but it has always served me well. Of course I have lived in places with good water straight out of the tap! Currently I am living in a real estate rehab house, and the water quality here is awful for fish. There are wild fluctuations in chemical composition, sometimes the chlorine is overwhelming. I do not trust it, and it has made keeping my tank level a chore.

As much as I like under gravel filters, I recognize their strengths and weaknesses- one weakness being the (slow) speed at which they can process the water. Larger established tanks can absorb spikes ok, but my little 30 gallon struggles under the load…. enter the sump filter.

Sumps can process the entirety of the tank’s water several times per hour, but they tend to be expensive if purchased from a fish store. When you break down their components, it turns out sumps are relatively inexpensive to build yourself.

Here are the major components:

  • Method of getting water out of the tank automatically
  • Filtration method to run the removed water through
  • Method of getting the water back into the tank

That’s it!

“But wait!”, you say, “It cannot be that easy!”

Really, the most difficult part of the project is getting the water out and back into the tank. I promise! The sump itself is simple. It consists of three parts:

  • Mechanical filtration
  • Biological filtration
  • Reservoir of cleaned water

Here is the big picture of my setup:

Getting water out of the tank utilizes a siphon and gravity- no electricity required. Just like the gravel vacuum you use when cleaning your tank. The water return is accomplished via an electric pump in the water reservoir, in this case, at the bottom of a 5 gallon bucket.

A cut away view of my sump looks like:

* The circles with an X in them are the biological filtration.

How does this work?

  • Water comes into the bucket
  • Then it is mechanically filtered via a layer of polyester
  • It tickles through the polyester into several layers of plastic pot scrubbies (yes, that you clean pans with!) that act as the biological filtration media. Bacteria loves to grow on this stuff!
  • Then falls into an empty space at the bottom of the buckets, the reservoir
  • Finally, an electric pump pumps it back into the tank

All told, this system cost less than $60 to build, vs hundreds to purchase from a pet store.

Here is a list of the components I used:

I put a ball valve on the water return line to be able to control the flow rate of water. I believe 250 – 300 gallons per hour is the current flow rate through this system. That means the entire tank water gets processed up to 10 times per hour! That is a lot of filtration….maybe a little overkill. Recommendations I saw around the web were around 5 times per hour as a minimum.

Overall a very simple project. The water clarity is outstanding and the fish are moving around happily. The main caveat here is that since this is a brand new sump it means it has to go through the whole cycling process. I am hoping it will be accelerated though since the tank as it was was cycled already. Some of that good bacteria should make its way into the sump to help prime it.

Have you built a sump before? What is your method?

If this post has inspired you to build one please drop a comment below. I would love to hear about your experience.

A couple great resources on the web for all things fish keeping

30_gallon_stand_cardboard_mockup

The 30 gallon fish tank stand is getting an upgrade – Sides!

With Clara crawling, it is time to baby-proof the house. One big project to tackle is the fish tank. Currently the 30 gallon tank sits on a custom stand made of 2x4s. There is a shelf on the bottom, that inevitably winds up holding tank gear. It is open for all the world to see. We are going to be closing it in  so that Clara cannot get ahold of any of the chemicals or electrical connections that are kept on that shelf.

This stand is fairly old, so this update will give is a whole new life. I do not recall exactly when we found this, but my buddy Jordan got it first I think- when we were teens still!

Here is the cardboard mock up of our solution.

30_gallon_stand_cardboard_mockup

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